“My Land of Birth”

Whenever people discuss different political things, governmental changes, etc. in the U.S., the Founding Fathers are often brought up.  “This was/was not the Founding Fathers’ intent,” is commonly said.  The plumb line for said item that is being discussed is whether it lines up with what the Founding Fathers intended.

For example, some feel that the Department of the Interior is “wrong” because it oversteps the role of government according to the Constitution.  It’s a ”waste” of resources, etc, since it’s not what the Founding Fathers intended.  However, what is it that makes it “wrong?”  Is it sinful for a government to have a Department of the Interior?   Considering that the Bible doesn’t really talk about national parks ;-) , I’m going to say no.  But why isn’t these seen as a preference issue rather than a “right/wrong” issue, since we are talking about a constitution, not the Word of God?  AND, since the U.S. Constitution calls for a republic, why is it assumed that the only things allowed EVER in the U.S. are the things specifically mentioned in the Constitution, and anything else is WRONG?

Along similar lines, when discussing other countries and their laws, those law are often compared to the U.S. Constitution and our form of government here, and then those laws are deemed “good” or “bad,” depending on how they line up with our Constitution.

What is it that makes us defend our Constution and form of government?  For those of us who are born here, is it because we are born here?  What about those who are born in Finland?  Or Zimbabwe? Or India?  Are the people that live in other countries as bent on the “rightness” of their Constitution?  Typically people don’t get much of a choice as to what country they live in or the government they are under, so do they automatically defend their form of government (note: NOT their government leaders) simply because they have no other choice?

Also, what makes us think that our form of government is better than, say, Canada’s?  From what I can tell, Canada has a republic as well (Carla, correct me if I’m wrong LOL), but it’s also very different from ours, and I have seen the Canadian government criticized by Americans for different policies and laws.  (Andrea has corrected me – Canada is a Dominion…see the comments.  Thanks, Andrea!  But it still applies. :-) )  Yet it’s because those laws are against OUR Constitution, NOT Canada’s.  In fact, if you ask the Canadians, they are pretty pleased with those laws.  Isn’t that what a republic is all about anyway?  Allowing the people to have a say?  So why are we complaining about what CANADIANS want to do?

This post probably doesn’t make much sense…I don’t even know if I really have a point.  I don’t even know how I feel about all of it myself, especially since I’ve always been pretty conservative when it comes to the U.S. Constitution.  These are just some ponderings that I’ve been having for a while….

  

About razorbackmama

I'm a 36yo woman who loves Jesus, my husband of 16 years, and my 7 precious children. We homeschool the older 5 (formally, anyway!). We attend a nondenominational, non-charismatic church.
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6 Responses to “My Land of Birth”

  1. Tracy says:

    Never thought about it like that. Usually I’ve heard that “arguement” because the government is much bigger than some of us would like causing us to pay alot more taxes than we deem as fair. I don’t think some of the things you mentioned are wrong or sinful. True it’s kinda nice having parks, etc. preserved to use as such. But for some other things, the gov. is just going overboard.

    But you do have a point… Just because WE do it a certain way doesn’t mean all countries should. We have to take into account too many factors for that to even be possible! And if I’m correct in where you’re getting this “angle” from, I also think their expectations are too high in what they expect from others to also do. ;-)

  2. Thoughtful observations! and I like the blog’s new look!

    > Now you know as Army people, technically we must defend it. But honestly, who’s to say it’s more sacred than another form? If we look at it honestly and into the big picture, we know God has told us to respect our civil laws and leaders — but we don’t live in a theocracy. That’s kinda the beauty and uniqueness of America — its early “Founding Fathers’ ” foresight into having a place where just regular people could live (either publicly or privately — their choice) and rise in the system if they wanted to.

    I’ve been reading some of the early Church Fathers. I guess I could ask the same kinds of questions about them. How do we know they received correctly some of the things they heard directly from Christ’s apostles? or did they?

    So anyway. I’ve come across your blog again, and I’m glad to be back online with ya. Have a wonderful day — you and all your little people.

  3. Andrea says:

    We are a Dominion here in Canada, not a republic I don’t think. :) We’re still (very loosely) governed by the British Monarchy. although it’s really just a figurehead at this point.

  4. Oh, that’s right, Andrea! I forgot about that! I’m glad you explained what a Dominion is! Thanks! I will edit my post. :-D

  5. Molly says:

    Sounds like you’re taking the pill that makes you wake up discovering you’re strapped to a wire and in a cacoon like bubble of ooze. (ala The Matrix).

    Ow.

    A small book that I read with a highlighter (and which is free in printable form somewhere online) is an old classic, “Our Enemy the State.” Can’t recommend it enough. Woah. That, and Shane Claiborne’s excellent books providing a reminder that we live in an Empire. The USA is no less or no more “godly” than any other empire, it just has it’s own unique flavor of being an empire.

    Trying to baptize the early years of America requires a heavy amount of historical revisionism, happily and eagerly provided complements of most Christian homeschooling history series.

    Coming out of it all is so hard.

    I’ve been reading some of the early Church Fathers. I guess I could ask the same kinds of questions about them. How do we know they received correctly some of the things they heard directly from Christ’s apostles? or did they?

    OH MAN, I am in the same place. It is blowing me away, seeing how much Greek philosophy they are appropriating. It’s really shaking me and yet freeing me at the same time. You know, everyone always saying that the emergents are all whacked out for heading off the beaten path and seeking to find a new way to follow Jesus? Well, reading the early fathers brings me to respect them more, and yet it also has really helped me see just how much believers of every age are imprisoned by their own cultural constructs. That doesn’t make mine good, but it does mean that they weren’t any better.

  6. And if I’m correct in where you’re getting this “angle” from, I also think their expectations are too high in what they expect from others to also do.

    Oh LOL Tracy! I’m not really getting these sort of things from any one person or even group of people. This post is the result of a conglomeration of thoughts over a long period of time. I just finally had a chance to write it all out. ;-)

    Now you know as Army people, technically we must defend it.

    Oh yes, definitely, Melinda! And I would do so anyway because I do love the U.S., and I do happen to like our form of government. ;-) I’ve just started thinking about how really we don’t have much of a choice as to what sort of government they live under, yet they vehemently defend it anyway. I find that very intriguing!